Slow Food Johannesburg https://slowfood.co.za Celebrating Slow Food in Johannesburg Sun, 11 Jun 2017 20:29:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 Celebrate Father’s Day with a difference: relaxing picnic lunch and picking of Rex Union oranges https://slowfood.co.za/rexunionorange/ Sat, 10 Jun 2017 21:59:59 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1707 It is citrus month and we have a special event for Father’s day to celebrate these fruits in a countryside setting.

Enjoy a Father’s Day with a difference in the Magalies on Sunday 18 June 2017.

Bring the whole family and join in the picking of Rex Union oranges followed by a picnic lunch between the trees and a oranges preserving workshop.

Date: Sunday 18 June

Time: 12h00 (allow for 90 minutes travel time from Linden/Northcliff area).

Address: Dunedin Farm. Opposite the entrance to Hunters Rest Hotel, 16 km before Rustenburg on the R24 from Magaliesburg.

Cost: R140 for Slow Food members, R180 for non-members, R80 for children under 12.

Limited space available, book only online: http://bit.ly/2RexUnionOranges 

The day will start with picking of the Rex Union oranges on the farm (pay per bag) followed by a preserving workshop on the making of Rex Union marmalade. Hilary Biller, food editor, author, TV chef, consummate cook and committee member of Slow Food JHB will be guiding this informative workshop.

Laid out amongst the trees will be a sumptuous lunch of smoked chicken, roast beef, salami, salads, pickles, olives, breads, cheeses, pate, jams and honey, all of which will be sourced from small producers.

After lunch take a peaceful stroll through the olive groves and buy some of their exceptional products.

The Rex Union variety of orange epitomises our efforts to preserve South Africa’s biodiversity. It is a cross between a pomelo and a seville orange that was created by George Rex and planted in an orchard opposite the Hunters Rest Hotel outside Rustenburg.

It makes for the best marmalade orange in South Africa.

Of critical importance is that, apart from a few trees in private gardens, the trees on this farm are the only trees in existence worldwide.

For that reason, on a recent visit to SA, Professor Francesco Sotile, Slow Foods advisor on agronomy, proposed that the Rex Union be declared a Presidium.  This means that worldwide awareness will be increased and efforts made to preserve the trees.

We will use this day to launch the process of creating a presidium – only the 4th in South Africa!

Rex Union recipe challenge!

Although the Rex Union has traditionally been used as a marmalade ingredient, we would like to challenge you to create new and exciting uses for the orange.

Send us your recipes and we will publish them.  Bring us a sample to taste if possible and by this means we will extend the use and preserve these trees in perpetuity.

The Rex History

George Wellington Rex III, the grandson of the more famous George Rex of Knysna,was said to have been the illegitimate son of King George III of Britain.

George Rex had nine children, but his grandson George Wellington Rex fathered no fewer than 14 with his wife, Georgina.

George Wellington Rex came to the Magaliesberg area in the mid-1880s to hunt big game. He stayed on, and became firm friends with President Paul Kruger, who by then had become a substantial land owner in the area.

Kruger ceded part of his Magaliesberg land to Rex, who then built Hunter’s Rest on the property. At first, it was a private hunter’s lodge for George Wellington Rex and his friends. It was later developed into a hotel, but the olde worlde charm and Victorian character was retained. George was a very knowledgeable, intelligent man and was given the right to practice medicine in the Rustenburg district by President Paul Kruger.

George Rex was the pioneer of grapefruit in South Africa and he ‘evolved’ a new grapefruit known as “Rex union.” He passed away in Rustenburg on 28 March 1923. The graves are in the family cemetery at Hunters Rest.

 

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Invitation to Slow Food Johannesburg AGM https://slowfood.co.za/johannesburg-agm/ Thu, 04 May 2017 20:58:42 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1698 Slow Food AGM

Slow Food Johannesburg AGM: Wednesday 17 May 2017

Members and guests are invited to join us in this year’s Slow Food Johannesburg Annual General Meeting on Wednesday 17 May 2017 at March restaurant, Melrose Arch with guest speaker Anna Trapido.

A special evening is planned for this year’s Slow Food Johannesburg AGM following a momentous past year which we will be building upon in 2017.

Tickets for the event are to be purchased online from: http://bit.ly/JHBAGMtickets

Following the 2016 visit of Slow Food founder, Carlo Petrini and the affirmation of the South African initiatives by Slow Food international, we are on the brink of big plans. We would like to offer you the opportunity to get involved and share our vision of the road ahead.

The ‘Ark of Taste’ has been a focus area for the past year which has resulted in a large number of South African products added to the international list. It is therefore fitting that we celebrate the past year with a specially prepared four course dinner dedicated to these identified products.

On the evening of Wednesday 17 May, your palate will be tantalized by: Nguni beef, Potchefstroom Koekoek chickens and a range of specially prepared Ark of Taste veggies.

We are very privileged to have food anthropologist and author, Dr Anna Trapido address us as this year’s guest speaker. Her knowledge and enthusiastic support for Slow Food has been remarkable and is set to be a very memorable evening.

Our host chef for the night is: Adrian Vigus-Brown. He is the chairperson of the South African Chefs Association (SACA) Young Chefs Club and is an ambassador for World Chefs Young Chefs Africa and the Middle East. Adrian has been a participant in all the Slow Meat Eat-Ins held to date and is an avid supporter of Slow Food.

Details of the evening:

Date: Wednesday 17 May 2017

Time: 18:30 for 19:00 sharp

Address: March Restaurant, 1 Melrose Square, Melrose Arch

Cost: R220 per person for members / R265 per person for non-members
Costs have remained the same four years.

Beverages: For own account, please do not bring own wine.

Book your place online: http://bit.ly/JHBAGMtickets

Event programme:

  • Convivium report
  • Financial report
  • New year objectives
  • Election of committee

About Anna Trapido:

Anna initially trained as an anthropologist at Kings College, Cambridge and later achieved a PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand. Her passion for food pushed her out of the library and into the kitchen. She trained as a chef at the Prue Leith College of Food and Wine and subsequently worked for the great, the good and not so good.

“My first love has always been the delicious diversity of African food genres. I do not understand why the numerous great cuisines of our continent are not better known. I have made it my life’s work to discover, record and promote the flavours of Africa, both ancient and modern, rural and urban, classic indigenous and settler fusion. Ultimately, mine is not an intellectual interest in matters epicurean but rather rooted in love, greet, joy and wonder. It reflects my fascination with the people doing the cooking and how their flavour repertoire interacts with their lives.”

We look forward to an exciting and engaging evening.

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Slow Food Johannesburg 2017 AGM Wednesday 17 May with guest speaker Anna Trapido https://slowfood.co.za/jhb_agm2017/ Thu, 04 May 2017 10:52:53 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1668 Slow Food Johannesburg AGM: Wednesday 17 May 2017

Members and guests are invited to join us in this year’s Slow Food Johannesburg Annual General Meeting on Wednesday 17 May 2017 at March restaurant, Melrose Arch.

A special evening is planned for this year’s Slow Food Johannesburg AGM following a momentous past year which we will be building upon in 2017.

Following the 2016 visit of Slow Food founder, Carlo Petrini and the affirmation of the South African initiatives by Slow Food international, we are on the brink of big plans. We would like to offer you the opportunity to get involved and share our vision of the road ahead.

The ‘Ark of Taste’ has been a focus area for the past year which has resulted in a large number of South African products added to the international list. It is therefore fitting that we celebrate the past year with a specially prepared four course dinner dedicated to these identified products.

On the evening of Wednesday 17 May, your palate will be tantalized by: Nguni beef, Potchefstroom Koekoek chickens and a range of specially prepared Ark of Taste veggies.

We are very privileged to have food anthropologist and author, Dr Anna Trapido address us as this year’s guest speaker. Her knowledge and enthusiastic support for Slow Food has been remarkable and is set to be a very memorable evening.

Our host chef for the night is: Adrian Vigus-Brown. He is the chairperson of the South African Chefs Association (SACA) Young Chefs Club and is an ambassador for World Chefs Young Chefs Africa and the Middle East. Adrian has been a participant in all the Slow Meat Eat-Ins held to date and is an avid supporter of Slow Food.

Details of the evening:

Date: Wednesday 17 May 2017

Time: 18:30 for 19:00 sharp

Address: March Restaurant, 1 Melrose Square, Melrose Arch

Cost: R220 per person for members / R265 per person for non-members
Costs have remained the same four years.

Beverages: For own account, please do not bring own wine.

Book your place online: http://bit.ly/JHBAGMtickets

Event programme:

  • Convivium report
  • Financial report
  • New year objectives
  • Election of committee

About Anna Trapido:

Anna initially trained as an anthropologist at Kings College, Cambridge and later achieved a PhD at the University of the Witwatersrand. Her passion for food pushed her out of the library and into the kitchen. She trained as a chef at the Prue Leith College of Food and Wine and subsequently worked for the great, the good and not so good.

“My first love has always been the delicious diversity of African food genres. I do not understand why the numerous great cuisines of our continent are not better known. I have made it my life’s work to discover, record and promote the flavours of Africa, both ancient and modern, rural and urban, classic indigenous and settler fusion. Ultimately, mine is not an intellectual interest in matters epicurean but rather rooted in love, greet, joy and wonder. It reflects my fascination with the people doing the cooking and how their flavour repertoire interacts with their lives.”

We look forward to an exciting and engaging evening.

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Slow Food presents the Serengeti Eat–in featuring Nguni Beef https://slowfood.co.za/slow-food-presents-serengeti-eat-featuring-nguni-beef/ Tue, 07 Mar 2017 14:55:57 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1646 Saturday 25th March 2017  |  12h00 – 17h00  |  Serengeti Golf & Wildlife Estate

If you consider yourself as a ‘conscious consumer’, this event is for you. If you believe that biodiversity should be defended, join us. If you just love good food prepared by some of Gauteng’s best chefs, you have to be there.

With increased demand, industrial farming has turned food into a machine that puts profit and efficiency before health and sustainability.

Slow Meat brings together producers, butchers, chefs and consumers to highlight a growing demand for meat that is good, clean and fair for all.

Never before have so many top notch chefs participated in a single event to produce the most scrumptious and creative food.

  • 10 Gauteng celebrity chefs cooking 10 different cuts, nose to tail.
  • Artisan producers market selling handcrafted products and fresh produce
  • Full Cash bar featuring Vrede en Lust wines
  • Craft beer available

You will receive:

  • 5 randomly selected tickets – each for a different plate of delectably prepared Nguni Beef
  • 1 ticket for a plate of secondary cut
  • 1 golden ticket to award to the chef whose food you most enjoyed

SLOW MEAT – What’s on your plate?

For more than 100 000 years Southern Africa has provided both the hunter and the hunted.  It’s not surprising that meat plays such an integral role in our daily lives, so deeply ingrained in the psyche of a nation. Rich and poor alike share this obsession, defining both culture and lifestyle.

The launch of Slow Food SA’s initiative “SLOW MEAT” during 2015 was indeed a watershed project for Slow Food. It was the first time that a major multi-city food event was held that brought together farmers of indigenous breeds, food processor (in the form of butcher and charcuterie maker), chef and consumer and was not sponsored by large food companies. Now an even more inclusive event – Serengeti Eat-In offers us an opportunity to eat nose to tail dishes prepared by a startling list of Gauteng’s premiere chefs…

Who’s cooking…

CONVENER CHEF – Arnold Tanzer (Head of Slow Food Chefs’ Alliance SA)

  1. Klaus Beqman – Coach & Manager Junior Culinary Team SA , Owner La Luna & Exec Chef Serengeti & HOST CHEF
  2. Adele Stiehler – Prue Leith and Slow Food Chef’s Alliance representative
  3. Adrian Vickus – Brown African Pride Melrose Arch and Head of Young Chefs Club
  4. James Diack – Coobs, National, Federal
  5. Shane Smit – Jamie’s Italian
  6. James Khoza – Exec Chef Sandton Sun Convention Centre and Vice Chairman SA Chef’s Association
  7. Matthew Foxon – 54 on Bath
  8. Hansjee Kalpesh – Chef at Michaelangelo Hotel
  9. Shaniel Dinna – Head Chef at Hyatt Rosebank
  10. Rocco Venter – Exec Chef Emoyeni

What’s cooking…

Our farmer, Victoria Dzowa farms indigenous Nguni cattle near Magaliesburg and will be supplying the meat for the event. Nguni cattle are registered by Slow Food as an Ark of Taste breed, one which is threatened by industrialisation and is of particular cultural importance in our country.

Click here for more information

Victoria Dzowa

Victoria Dzowa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But there is more…

Also on the day will be

  • An artisan producers market selling the products – bring your cooler box to stock up
  • A display by Slow Food Youth Network
  • Live music
  • Full cash bar, craft beer & Vrede en Lust wines

How to book tickets:

Tickets online at Quicket go to:

https://www.quicket.co.za/events/27041-serengeti-eat-in/

Ticket Prices

R295 p/p Slow Food Members

R 335 p/p Non Slow Food Members

R75 p/p Children under 12

 

 

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Slow Meat Durban Eat-in Featuring Zulu Mutton https://slowfood.co.za/slow-meat-durban-eat-featuring-zulu-mutton/ Thu, 07 Jul 2016 20:13:05 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1633 slow-meat-event

Sunday 31st July 2016

12h00 – 16h00

Durban Country Club

Following on the success of last years Beef event, Slow Meat returns this year with another exciting event featuring indigenous mutton.

  • 10 KZN celebrity chefs cooking 10 different cuts
  • Comparative tasting between Zulu and commercially grown mutton.
  • 12 artisan producers selling handcrafted products and fresh produce
  • Protea wines on sale
  • Craft beer available

You will receive

  • 5 randomly selected tickets – each for a different plate of delectably prepared mutton
  • 1 ticket for a plate of secondary cut
  • 1 golden ticket to award to the chef whose food you most enjoyed

slowmeat

How to book tickets:

Tickets online at Quicket go to:

https://www.quicket.co.za/events/19372-slow-meat-durban-eat-in/

For further info go to:

https://slowfoodimifinokzn.wordpress.com/

 conference@durbancountryclub.co.za

Ticket Prices

R295 per person

Children under 12 – R 75.00

image01

 

 

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Slow Meat – 100 000 years of African heritage https://slowfood.co.za/slow-meat-100-000-years-african-heritage/ Mon, 23 May 2016 19:56:02 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1614 Evening all 

Just a quick reminder of our AGM next week.  We still have space if you would like to share the evening with us.

For more than 100 000 years Southern Africa has provided both the hunter and the hunted.  It’s not surprising that meat plays such an integral role in our daily lives, so deeply ingrained in the psyche of a nation. Rich and poor alike share this obsession, defining both culture and lifestyle.

The launch of Slow Food SA’s initiative “SLOW MEAT” during 2015 was indeed a watershed project for Slow Food. It was the first time that a major multi-city food event was held that brought together farmers of indigenous breeds, food processor (in the form of butcher and charcuterie maker), chef and consumer and was not sponsored by large food companies.

SLOW MEAT is an international campaign by Slow Food to highlight the importance of good, clean and fair in regards to a staple of South Africa’s plates – meat. Attend any gathering of South Africans, of every race and social status, and chances are you will be brought around a braai and probably snack on biltong and droewors. Chances are at the same braai many would know about organic veggies and free range chickens but have no idea how most of the meat consumed in cities is raised and culled. Until now there has not been a single national focus on where our meat comes from and the serious challenges faced by our fast declining animal farmers.

SLOW MEAT in South Africa has 5 objectives –

  1. Know your farmer and food processor – The easiest way to avoid meat scandals in the future is to buy directly from a farmer if possible. If this is not possible then form a relationship with a butcher – not the meat aisle in a supermarket where the expertise and reliability of a qualified butcher are reduced to fancy labels with misleading descriptions and glossy photos. By getting as close to source as possible means being able to verify that the animals are raised as close to nature and culled as humanely as is possible.
  2. Biodiversity in the pot – We live in a country blessed by a large variety of animals but few species are eaten today. From the vast numbers of game species to the smaller species like veld rabbits, we still cling to huge consumption of beef, lamb, chicken and pork. As long as we do this, we are encouraging the mass production of this meat which results in the ever growing intensive feedlotting that is occurring which spells the end for our indigenous breeds and small family farms. In addition biodiversity means knowing what cattle, sheep, chicken and pig species are indeed indigenous to our country and choosing these.
  3. Nose to tail – Whilst this is fashionable at the moment with many local chefs following international trends by using more of the lesser known cuts, consumers still cling to the steaks and primal cuts (less than 20% of the whole carcass). The nutritional importance of the secondary cuts and offal are starting to become known thanks to discussions around diets like banting and paleo but mostly people cling to rejecting these parts. The quickly rising costs of food, but meat in particular, is lowering the resistance of middle income families to swapping out the more expensive primal cuts. However there is still a lot of work to be done.
  4. Preserving meat – One of the most important ways meat can be used from nose to tail is by preserving meat. Immediately we think of biltong and droewors. Most of us growing up remember a relative who in winter would hang strips of cured meat in the garage to make biltong. This tradition has been lost with our younger generation so far removed from the food chain that many cannot even name the animal a “chop” comes from. Preservation of meat includes getting back to making at home our own stocks and using tallow instead of oil for cooking.
  5. Eat South African – Should you ever be fortunate enough to read early South African recipes or ask your elders for recipes for what they ate, you quickly discover 2 important truths  –
  6. There is no 1 iconic dish but various most based on the consumption of non-primal meat cuts; and
  7. There was a lot more biodiversity on the types of meat eaten in the past.

The launch event of SLOW MEAT held appropriately in the Cradle of Humankind so an entire Afrikaner heifer cooked by 10 of the top chefs in Gauteng. The public were asked to vote for their favourite dish on the day and this honour went to Phil de Villers of 54 on Bath. 

In Durban a conference was held on the day prior to the event where everyone in the food chain was present and a healthy debate was held into what the barriers were to sourcing, cooking with and eating good, clean and fair meat. On the Saturday once more 10 of the top chefs from Durban competed at Durban Country Club for the top honour. This time it was Gerard van Staden who won for the best dish. Slow Meat organisers, Caroline McCann and Chef Arnold Tanzer, were asked to host a dinner for Conservation South Africa and its international branches in Cape Town late last year. This culminated in Conservation South Africa officially becoming a partner to Slow Meat.
slow-meat-menu

 

SLOW MEAT 2016 will see another round of this exciting event hosted at Country Club Johannesburg (Auckland Park), Durban Country Club and the first ever Soweto Theatre Eat In. There is also plans afoot to host similar events in Cape Town, the Karoo, Eastern Cape, Polokwane and Limpopo.

In addition SLOW MEAT SA will be given a restaurant one of the evenings during Terra Madre in Turin, Italy, in September 2016, where we will be asked to cook a traditional South African meal for guests. The team will be made up of Chefs Arnold Tanzer, Phil de Villers, Luxolo Tabat (Young Chef’s Alliance), Geoffrey Green (10 000 Food Gardens of South Africa), Gordon Wright (Slow Food Karoo) and butchers Caroline McCann and Sydwell Ledwaba. This is a fantastic honour for us to show the world what South Africa eats and bring our food to the fore in one of the largest food shows in the world.

The aim of SLOW MEAT SA for 2016 is to spread the word far and wide – eat South African meat, raised by South African farmers, processed by South African butchers to ensure the security of our food system, which is primarily based on the consumption of meat.

 

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Slow Food AGM – Thrusday 26th May – Groundbreaking year ahead https://slowfood.co.za/1606-2/ Mon, 23 May 2016 19:49:39 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1606 slowfood-snail-plantsIt’s time for our AGM once again and we have some big announcements and some even bigger plans ahead. So much has been achieved in the last 12 months and there is so much more to do.  South Africa is pioneering a new direction for Slow Food due to be launched at Terra Madre in Turin later this year.  We would like to share this new initiative with you and set the path for the year ahead.

Please join us for a convivial

Our special guest speaker this year is Dr Naude Malan

Dr. Malan has been with UJ for more than 15 years and is currently a Senior Lecturer. He is the convener of the Izindaba Zokudla (conversations about food) multi-stakeholder engagement project that aims to create opportunities for urban agriculture in a sustainable food system in Johannesburg.  Dr. Malan has published on agriculture, methods for agricultural development, human rights, social policy and civil society.​

Convivium Leader report – Brian Dick

Financial Report – Dennis Conway

Report back and 2016/7 objectives for:

  • Slow Meat – Caroline McCann
  • 10 000 Gardens – Geoff Green
  • Ark of Taste – Melissa de Billot
  • Sustainable and Ethical food workshop – Lorraine Jenks

Wine appreciation – Ark of Taste Pinotage – Andrew Adrian

Election of new committee

We will be spoilt with a three course dinner prepared by HTA School of Culinary Art and the costs for the evening are the same for the third year in a row!  So much for food inflation.

DETAILS OF THE EVENING

When: Thursday 26th May 2016l.

Time: 7pm sharp.

Where: HTA School of Culinary Art:

128 Bram Fischer Drive, Randburg ( a block away from Mnet/Multichoice) Secure off-street parking.

Cost: MEMBERS R220 pp / NON-MEMBERS R265 pp.

Drinks: This will be for your own account along with any cocktails, digestifs and hot drinks.

Bookings: Brian on sacheese@gmail.com.

Payments: Please wait for your booking confirmation and reference number and then send me proof of payment.

Deposits after confirmation to Slow Food Johannesburg, A/C# 224199358, Standard Bank, Sandton Branch, 00019205.

Membership: You can join or renew at the same time for the price of R157 per person per annum.

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10 000 Gardens For Africa – Why not 10 000 For South Africa https://slowfood.co.za/10-000-gardens-africa-not-10-000-south-africa/ Mon, 23 May 2016 19:49:26 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1611 With the past years drought, food security is severely threatened and the need to find ways of alleviating the plight of many thousands of poor and unemployed people should be the concern of us all.  The discovery that right on our doorstep many people are working to help themselves is a revelation and something Slow Food will try to highlight and assist where possible.  Geoff’s initiative at the Sparrow Village farm has captured the imagination of both the media and hopefully the corporate world.

Michael at the Sparrow Farm

Michael at the Sparrow Farm

Slow Food Gardens – Johannesburg

In late February this year, the Johannesburg Convivium resolved to actively encourage the establishment of food gardens across the city and to identify existing food gardens as they were discovered. After some initial research into the prospects of the project during March, a Slow Food Garden sub committee was established in April.

Several groups of people from lower income communities have subsequently been identified including a University of Johannesburg founded group, Izindaba Zokudla, (Conversations about food), with whom we now have a working relationship.

We have to date made contact with ±200 urban food gardeners in Soweto and are in the process of measuring their activities against our Slow Food credo of good, clean and fair food. These gardeners will ultimately be added to a register of good clean and fair food producers with their gardens mapped and made available to potential new markets.

A Train the Trainers workshop has been held where 20 existing urban farmers were trained at Sparrow Farm on how to maximize the use of their available land and how best to encourage more people to grow their own food. Using our 10 000 Gardens in Africa Slow Food handbook, these urban farmers are working with a combined total of 100 new food gardeners and are assisting them to become viable micro organic food business entities. An additional 30 small-scale food growers have attended a food-growing course at Sparrow farm. (Sparrow Farm is managed by one of our members who grows food for ±150 residents on land made available to him on the grounds of an orphanage and hospice in Maraisburg).

Our sub committee’s work, as early as it is into the project, has received calls of interest to be included in this work from as far afield as Cape Town, Bloemfontein, Amamzimtoti, Limpopo and Mpumalanga. Two radio interviews have taken place and reporters have visited us from The Star and Farmers Weekly with the promise of published stories soon.

Through interest shown from areas outside of Johannesburg we expect to be in a position to have at least 350 gardens mapped in greater Johannesburg and a total of as many as 1000 around the country by spring this year. If you have a Slow Food garden or know of someone who does please get in touch with us so we can be sure to include it on our map.

Your Slow Food Johannesburg Food Gardens sub committee includes; Geoff Green, Brian Dick, Caroline McCann, Melissa de Billot, Angus Campbell and Naude Malan, Angus and Naude from UJ.

Geoff Green

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Slow Meat Conference- A discussion of good, clean and fair meat in the South African context https://slowfood.co.za/slow-meat-conference-a-discussion-of-good-clean-and-fair-meat-in-the-south-african-context/ Wed, 19 Aug 2015 15:58:02 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1590 FRIDAY 28th AUGUST 2015—09h00:12h30

DURBAN COUNTRY CLUB
COST: R100.00 per person including tea and coffee.

To book, contact Durban Country on 031 313 1777

Join us for a Slow Meat conference about good, clean and fair meat from both a farmer’s and a consumer’s point of view.

What to expect:

Welcome by Brian Dirk: Slow Food Chairman South Africa

Session 1 – A farmer’s perspective on good, clean and fair meat : Introduction to topic by Caroline McCann

  • Breed: Does it matter?
  • Production Systems: Intensive versus other farming systems – Does it make a difference when selling good, clean and fair meat? Adrian Cloete
  • Meat value chain: How do we provide the link from farm to plate to ensure good, clean and fair meat?
  • Panel Questons:
    1. Does the current system work for the small farmer who practices good, clean and fair farming?
    2. Is labelling the answer to telling the story? Current legislation restrictions and conflicts.
    3. With so many labels and organisations does it make it difficult for everyone in the meat value chain to speak the same language be universally understood?
    4. Is good, clean and fair meat only for those with disposable income?

Session 2 – The consumer’s perspective of good, clean and fair meat: Introduction to topic by Caroline McCann

  • Butcher – How do we sell good, clean and fair meat to the consumer? A case study of Hope Meat.
  • Chef – Why does a chef need to ask where their meat comes from?
  • Alternate retailers – What role do farmer’s markets play in bringing good, clean and fair meat to the urban consumer?
  • The Rise of the Conscious Consumer – Is there a growing demand for good, clean and fair meat? Megan Power
  • Panel Questions
    1. How do you find good, clean and fair meat if you are wanting to buy it?
    2. How do you balance out the demands for cheap meat and a fair price necessary to keep small farms going?
    3. How do we get the best value out of a carcass – nose to tail eating and preservation of meat.
    4. Will getting families cooking together make a difference in what we buy and consume?
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EAT A COW – A SLOW MEAT INITIATIVE https://slowfood.co.za/eat-a-cow-a-slow-meat-initiative/ Sun, 16 Aug 2015 09:34:24 +0000 https://slowfood.co.za/?p=1583 slowmeat

30TH AUGUST 2015
DURBAN COUNTRY CLUB

With increased demand, industrial farming has turned food production into a machine that puts profit and efficiency, ahead of health and sustainability. SLOW MEAT brings together farmers, butchers, hand crafted artisan meat product producers, chefs and consumers to highlight the growing demand for meat that is good, clean and fair for all.

A first in KwaZulu Natal – ten of KZN’s premier chefs collaborating to cook you a
sumptuous feast. This unique outdoor experience will be held on Sunday 30th August
2015 at Durban Country Club.
● 10 different nose to tail cuts of grass fed Afrikaner beef, each prepared by a premier chef
● 12 artisan producers selling handcrafted meat products
● KZN Wine Master
● Craft beer brewer
You will receive:
● 5 randomly selected tickets – each for a different plate each prepared from 5 selected chefs
● 1 ticket for an offal dish
● 1 golden ticket to award your favourite chefs creation (winning chef wins a Big Green Egg)
● Dessert

Date: 30th August 2015
Time: 11h30 – 16h00
Ticket Price: R295.00 per person.
Cash Bar available
Under 12 – R75.00 includes burger,
homemade chips, fresh cordial,
free access to the kids zone.

HOW TO BOOK YOUR TICKETS:
Via: Durban Country Club
Tel: 031 313 1377
Further info: please emailslowmeatsa@gmail.comevents@dcclub.co.za

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